Category Archives: Ethernet Switch

What Does Combo SFP Port Mean For Your Ethernet Switch?

To many noobs who are unfamiliar with the structure and functionality of Ethernet switches may get confused with Combo SFP ports. Combo SFP ports are often labeled obviously. You may have some questions in your mind like what is Combo port and how should I use with it. Since there are many Gigabit Ethernet ports and SFP slots on switches, you may ask whether I used these ports correctly? Don’t worry, this post aims to explain Combo SFP port for your reference.

SFP Transceiver

What Is Combo SFP Port?

A Gigabit Ethernet Combo port is both a copper port, i.e. a RJ-45 interface and a SFP port (also called Mini-GBIC connector). It supports both copper (RJ-45) connections and optional industry-standard SFP (small form factor pluggable) modules. Combo SFP ports share the same switch fabric and port number and allow the user to configure their switch according to their application. But you can’t use both of them at the same time. When either of the ports are enabled, the other port is automatically disabled. It means that you can either have a cable plugged into the copper 10/100/1000 interface, or the cable plugged into the SFP slot. If you have both plugged in Combo ports, only one will work. For example, a switch has 12 x 10/100/1000Base-T ports and 2 Gigabit Ethernet Combo ports, therefore it could be configured to have 14 copper ports or 13 copper ports & 1 SFP port, or 12 copper ports & 2 SFP ports, etc.

A Combo port is a way to provide different types of connectivity without taking up unused switch fabric, giving users the power and flexibility to configure their switch for their unique application requirements.

Introduction to FS.COM 24-Port Switch With 4 Combo SFP Ports

There are many switches with combo SFP ports, such as Linksys LGS318 which is a 18-port Smart Gigabit Switch with two combo shared ports and Netgear ProSafe 24-port Gigabit Switch with 2 Gigabit Combo SFP—JGS524F. Today I’m going to recommend FS.COM 24-port switch with 4 Combo SFP—S3800-24F4S.

24 port switch with 4 combo sfp

S3800-24F4S 24-port Gigabit switch is designed to meet the demand of cost-effective Gigabit access or aggregation for enterprise networks and operators customers. The Combo SFP ports—a single interface with dual front ends (an RJ-45 connector and an SFP module connector) on S3800-24F4S 24-port switch facilitate the use of different connectivity, making it more flexible to configure the switch. It has a console port, 4 × 1GE Combo ports, 20 × 100/1000Base SFP ports and 4 × 10GE SFP+ ports. It offers up to 128Gbps switching capacity to simultaneously process traffic on all ports at line rate without any packet loss.

Conclusion

Generally speaking, Combo SFP ports are labeled by vendors. If you can’t tell, here is a way to help you identify. Identifying a combo port is based on the interface identifier on the switch panel. If two ports have the same ID but connect to different transmission media, the two ports are multiplexed as a combo port. Then you can run the display interface command to display the combo port. If you need any 24-port switch or any other Ethernet switch, welcome to consult FS.COM.

How Can We Benefit From 24-Port Managed PoE Switch?

When you search for PoE switches, there are many options popping out, and you’ll be trapped into a dilemma. How should I make a decision between managed switches and unmanaged switches? But most recommendations are managed switches. It seems like managed switches are superior to unmanaged switches. It’s true. Because its security features. They allow administrators visibility and control. But the benefits of managed switches are more than this. The following text will cover what managed switches can do and where 24 ports PoE managed switches are used for your reference.

Why Should Choose Managed Switch Over Unmanaged Switch?

A managed switch can seriously expand the long-range flexibility of your network and it can adapt to changing priorities. As your organization grows, your business needs will continue to evolve. Having a device that can respond to the dynamic shape of your operation is a good investment. There are several reasons why a managed switch is recommended:

  • Managed switches have all the features of an unmanaged switch and additionally have the ability to configure, manage, and monitor your LAN. So this helps you to monitor and decide who should have access to your network and gives you greater control over data flow through your network.
  • If there is an unused port on your managed switch, you can disable that port or even apply MAC address filtering so as not to allow unauthorised users or devices to access the network by just plugging in. So you can secure your network connections and also protect any unused ports on your switch.
  • A major advantage of managed switches is the failover redundancy they add to your network, helping to achieve less network downtime. Managed switches incorporate Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) to provide path redundancy in the network. This provides redundant paths but prevents loops that are created by multiple active paths between switches.

Where Are 24-Port Managed PoE Switches Used?

What are some of the ways a 24 ports PoE managed switch can enhance your organization’s networking capabilities? We need not look any further than the devices these switches connect. Some of the many things a 24-port PoE switch may be used for are:

overview of PoE managed switch

Note: S1400-24T4F managed PoE switch comes with 24x 10/100/1000Base-T RJ45 Ethernet ports, 1x console port, 2x combo port, and 2x gigabit SFP slots.

IP Cameras

To power an IP megapixel camera network, you’ll need a total power per port of 30W. For a 24-Port gigabit PoE managed switch with a power budget of 360W, you can continue to add IP cameras until you reach your budget. If you have 2 SFP ports, you can also connect to multiple switches, as well.

PoE solution

PoE Wireless Access Points (WAPs)

PoE WiFi access points (WAPs) require roughly 30 watts per port for efficient functioning. When you adopt PoE managed switches, installation of controllers and access points is greatly simplified. You won’t need to provide separate power cables or install plugs near wi-fi locations. You’d simply run your Cat5e or Cat6 Cable from your HotSpot to your switch and leave it alone.

Thin Clients

According to wikipedia, thin client is a lightweight computer built to connect to a server from a remote location. It has a barebones design and rely heavily on servers, which allow customers to get access to virtual desktop applications. Furthermore, it help lower costs by about 97%. Since they can access applications, sensitive data and memory from a data center via a managed PoE switch, they have no hard drive.

Conclusion

Since a managed switch has much more advantages over an unmanaged one. It’s necessary for you to have a managed switch in your network. In many cases, future-proofing with a better PoE switch (with more ports) may actually be a much better investment than smaller switches that have fewer ports. Thus, 24-port managed PoE switch is recommended here.