Things to Know About SFP+ DAC

Over the years, network cabling has undergone profound changes. 10GbE has successfully extended its coverage from enterprise data centers to medium network market. As the demands increase, it’s important to find an optimized solution for 10GbE applications. In this case, SFP+ DAC serves as a good option. This post will introduce basic information about SFP+ DAC.

What Is SFP+ DAC?

SFP+ DAC (direct attach cable), also named SFP+ DAC twinax cable or SFP+ direct attach copper cable, is a fixed assembly with a fixed length, and the SFP+ connector modules permanently attaches to each end of the cable. By connecting two SFP+ slots directly, SFP+ DAC effectively eliminates the costly optical transceivers required by the device and significantly reduces power consumption, latency, and installation time. Meanwhile, it uses an enhanced SFP+ connector to send data up to 10Gbps through a pair of transmitters and receivers over a thin twinax cable. Thus SFP+ DAC has become an optimized choice for modern short-range, high-speed 10 Gigabit Ethernet applications.

SFP+ DAC

Types of SFP+ DAC

SFP+ DAC comes to two different types: passive SFP+ DAC and active SFP+ DAC.

Passive SFP+ DAC

Passive SFP+ DAC contains no electrical components, thus it requires little to no direct power to operate. So the host networking device must support the signal processing functions. When a SFP+ is inserted, networking gear compatible with passive SFP+ DAC reads the module type, and the signal conditioning is activated only when a passive SFP+ DAC is detected. Passive SFP+ DAC can afford the length ranging from 0.5m to7m, but it’s more susceptible to degradation due to attenuation and crosstalk.

Active SFP+ DAC

Active SFP+ DAC needs DC power to integrate signal processing circuitry into its built-in connectors. That’s one of the reasons why active SFP+ DAC is usually more expensive than passive SFP+ DAC. Active SFP+ DAC has a silicon chip to improve the performance of the cable. It allows cables to be smaller, thinner, longer, and transmit data faster. It affords the length ranging over 7m.

Passive SFP+ DAC vs Active SFP+ DAC

Passive SFP+ DAC Benefits
  • It has a lower cost and higher reliability.
  • It has fewer components (No Active Tx /Rx Components) and only has capacitors, resistors, EEPROM and cable.
Active SFP+ DAC Benefits
  • It improves signal integrity and allows longer cable lengths.
  • It provides Transmit Pre-emphasis and Active/Adaptive Receive Equalization.
  • It allows no worries about host Tx/Rx for Cu cables

From the above, we can come to the conclusion that passive SFP+ DAC is much less expensive but requires the host to do the work of driving it properly, while active SFP+ DAC offers added benefits but cost a lot. When the distance is no more than 7m, passive SFP+ DAC is recommended. As for link distance is beyond 7m, active SFP+ DAC would be required.

Conclusion

SFP+ DAC is a cost-effective option to traditional fiber and twisted-pair copper cables in data center deployments. It can provide better performance for high-density deployments and improve electrical characteristics for the most reliable signal transmission. It’s typically used for connections between in-rack and inter-rack. So if you are looking for one, FS.COM offers various of high quality SFP+ DAC with different lengths. And we also offer customized services to meet your special needs. If you’re interested, please contact us at FS.COM.

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Web Smart Switch vs Managed Switch

Speaking of today’s market of network switches, there are three main fiber switches having to be mentioned: unmanaged switch, managed switch and web smart switch. In the previous articles, we compared managed switch with unmanaged switch for home network. In this article, we will continue to make a contrast. So web smart switch vs managed switch, which one should you choose, the decision depends on the size of your network and how much control you need over that network.

alt Web Smart Switch vs Managed Switch

What Is Web Smart Switch?

A web smart switch, also named smart switch or smart managed switch, is a popular option for mid-sized networks that require management. It provides features like QoS (Quality of Service), RSTP (Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol), SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol), CLI (Command Line Interface), LACP, VLANs, redundancy capability, and so on. Web smart switch is managed via a web browser that provides intuitive guidance for users to manage their networks. It has limited selection of advanced management, poorer scope of configuration flexibility and little to no security features.

What Is Managed Switch?

Similar to web smart switch, a managed switch can be configured and managed correctly to provide a more tailored experience for users. It not only offers tools and means to monitor the network but also gives the network administrator greater control over managing and prioritizing LAN (local area network) traffic. Managed switch allows users in charge of setting everything up, but users have to take all the responsibility for the operation.

Web Smart Switch vs Managed Switch: What’s the Difference?

The differences between web smart switch and managed switch have always been discussed. Here are some obvious differences between them.

Function

Web Smart Switch
  • It offers options like QoS, VLANs, and so on.
  • It’s ideal for VoIP phones, small VLANs, and working groups for places like labs.
  • It allows you to configure ports, basic settings and set up virtual networks.
  • It allows you to assign higher priority to critical traffic.
  • It can divide your network into multiple virtual networks for better traffic security and reliable connectivity.
  • It helps to allocate network bandwidth the way you work.
Managed Switch
  • It provides high-levels of network security, control and management.
  • It can limit access to specific devices, prioritize user traffic and partition a network.
  • It can use layer 3 routing capability to link smaller networks into much larger business-wide networks.
  • It can remotely monitor network performance, detect and repair network problems without having to physically check devices or requiring network services.
  • It can optimize a network’s speed and resource utilization.

Application

A web smart switch is an entry-level managed switch. It’s especially suitable for a business network hosting less than 100 active users. If there is no advanced applications required, web smart switch is the best solution for simple applications such as small and midsize enterprise networks.
An managed switch is ideal for businesses that need to remotely and securely manage and troubleshoot their network. It enables network managers to monitor and control traffic to achieve optimal network performance and reliability. It allows the network to be expanded with flexibility.

Price

Considering the features and functions provided by web smart switch and managed switch, there is no doubt that managed switch is more expensive than web smart switch. Since managed switch allows the network to grow in the future, it worth the price over time.

Web Smart Switch vs Managed Switch: Which Is Best for You?

Web smart switch vs managed switch, the differences do exist. No matter which type to choose, you have to consider your demands first. If you have no limit of expenditure and want to have more control over the network, managed switch is the best choice. If you want to support one small company or colleague with a lower price, web smart switch is good enough. If you don’t know which one suits you best, FS.COM provides various switches to satisfy all your needs.

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Managed or Unmanaged Switch for Home Network

Review on Fiber Cable Connectors

Fiber cable connectors are designed to provide perfect alignment of the microscopic glass fibers that were used in fiber cables to transmit data. These kinds of connections must be highly accurate in order to facilitate high speed fiber optic networks. This article helps to review some common fiber cable connector types available on the market today.

What Is Fiber Cable Connector?

Fiber cable connector, also named fiber optic connector or optical fiber connector, is a hardware installed on fiber cable ends. It provides cable attachment to a transmitter, receiver or other cable. There are various fiber cable connectors, for which different connectors have different characteristics and functions. According to statistics, about 100 different types of fiber cable connectors have been introduced to the market.

Fiber Cable Connector Constructions

The most popular used ones are ST, SC, FC and LC style connectors, which vary differently from characteristics, applications and performances. But all the connectors have three major components: the ferrule, the connector body, and the coupling mechanism. Among those, the ferrule is used for protecting and aligning the stripped fiber end. The connector body holds the ferrule and attaches to the jacket and strengthens fiber cable. The coupling mechanism is a part of the connector body that keeps the connector in place when connected to other devices.

Common Fiber Cable Connectors and Their Differences

ST Connector

ST connector was developed by AT&T. It’s a high-performance fiber optic connector with cylindrical ceramic ferrules and bayonet locking features. Most ferrules are ceramic, but some are metal or plastic. ST connector is constructed with a metal housing and is nickel-plated, can be inserted into and removed from a fiber optic cable both quickly and easily. It’s commonly used in network environments such as campuses, corporate networks, industrial and military applications.

altST Connector of Fiber Cable Connectors

SC Connector

SC connector is a snap-in connector with a round 2.5mm ferrule used to hold a single mode fiber (SMF). It sometimes refers to “square connector” because of its “square shaped” connector body. It’s intended for Gigabit Ethernet networking with features of low price and excellent performance. SC connector is ideal for data communication and telecommunications applications, and still popular over the years.

altSC Connector of Fiber Cable Connectors

FC Connector

FC Connector is the first optical fiber connector to use a certain ferrule. It utilizes a round screw-type fitment made from nickel-plated or stainless steel. The end face relies on an alignment key for correct insertion and is then tightened into the adaptor/jack using a threaded collet. It’s commonly used in data communication, telecommunications, measurement equipment, and single-mode lasers. SC and LC connector deliver similar performance to FC connector but both of them have less expensive components, thus FC connector with screw-on collet performs effectively in high-vibration environments.

altFC Connector of Fiber Cable Connectors

LC Connector

LC connector is featured with a ferrule of 1.25mm, which makes it perfect for high density cabling. It’s available in simplex and duplex versions. It has half the footprint of the SC connector, thus it becomes the most popular connector in data communication and other high-density patch applications. LC connector is ubiquitous nowadays, especially for connections with SFP and SFP+ fiber transceivers.

altLC Connector of Fiber Cable Connectors

Conclusion

There are about 100 fiber cable connectors introducing to the market, but only a few represent the majority of the market. Here is a brief review on fiber cable connectors that have been the leaders of the industry. If you’d like more information on different fiber cable connectors, FS.COM has a complete fiber cable connector guide for you.

Related Articles:
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Managed or Unmanaged Switch for Home Network

A network switch is a computer networking device, which uses packet switching to connect devices together on a computer network in order to receive, process and forward data to the destination device. There are two common types of switch: managed switch and unmanaged switch, both of which play an important role in home network. So should I use managed or unmanaged switch for home network?

Managed or Unmanaged Switch for Home Network

What Is a Managed Switch?

A managed switch can be configured and managed correctly to provide a more tailored experience for users. It not only offers tools and means to monitor the network but also gives the network administrator greater control over managing and prioritizing LAN (local area network) traffic. Managed switch allows users in charge of setting everything up, but users have to take all the responsibility for the operation.

What Is an Unmanaged Switch?

An unmanaged switch, on the contrary, is a plug-and-play switch that already has all the required program settled, and does not require user intervention, setup or configuration. Here’s one thing to note: the unmanaged switch is manufactured with a standard configuration that cannot be changed, you should think twice before you buy it.

Managed or Unmanaged Switch for Home Network?

Managed switch is able to be configured for more advanced functions while unmanaged switch can’t. Knowing the differences between the two will do a favor in selecting managed or unmanaged switch for home network.

Differences and Similarities Between Managed and Unmanaged Switch

Similarities
  • They allow multiple devices to connected to the network to communicate with each other.
Differences
  • An unmanaged switch is a “plug and play” switch, simply allows Ethernet devices to communicate with one another, such as a desktop PC or router.
  • A managed switch not only provides all the features of an unmanaged switch but also gives you the tools and means to monitor your LAN traffic for a stable and ideal network.
  • A managed switch prioritizes through configuration changes whereas an unmanaged switch is shipped with a fixed configuration and does not allow any changes to this configuration.

Managed Switch for Home Network

A managed switch offers high-levels of network security. It incorporates STP (Spanning Tree Protocol) to provide path redundancy to keep your network safe. So if you need to handle some sensitive information at home, we recommend going with managed switch. It is able to implement VLANs, which allow network administrators to group devices together without running new cables or changing the network infrastructure, to prioritize user traffic for a better performance in a network. A managed switch allows you to configure port mirroring to forward copies of traffic to a single port on the same switch for analysis by a network analyser. The benefit of using managed switch at home is you can diagnose and fix problems without taking the network out of service. In short, a managed switch is ideal for operations that require monitoring and control capabilities. It costs the most, but worth the price over time.

Unmanaged Switch for Home Network

However, an unmanaged switch will work in the most basic form. It can’t be modified or managed. It allows your devices to connect with one another, handles everything automatically. If you’re using unmanaged switch in your home or a small network of fewer than 5-10 computers, it provides ample support. To sum it up, an unmanaged switch is ideal for primary learners with cheaper price.

Conclusion

Now that you know the advantages of managed and unmanaged switches, also the differences between them, you should be able to decide managed or unmanaged switch for home network. For home network, managed switch is for configuring, managing, and monitoring, while unmanaged switch is for simple operating, low in cost. If you are still unsure about the features mentioned above or are confused about the problem confronted, please do not hesitate in getting in touch with FS.COM, we will be more than happy to help with your networking needs.

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Getting to Know the DWDM Transceivers in DWDM Systems

To keep pace with the rapid growth of Internet traffic, service providers have been seeking to improve fiber capacity and wavelength spectrum efficiency in their networks. In response to this situation, DWDM technology is emerging. DWDW is an optical multiplexing technique for increasing the bandwidth of existing fiber networks. DWDM transceivers are important parts of DWDM network, which provide high-capacity and long-distance transmissions. Let’s take a closer look together.

dwdm transceivers

What are DWDM and DWDM Transceiver?

DWDM refers to dense wavelength division multiplexing, which is a technology that gathers data signals from different sources, enables them to share a single optical fiber pair while the separation of data streams is ensured. It supports up to 80 simultaneous wavelength channels, with each of the channels only 0.8nm apart. The technology creates multiple virtual fibers thus multiplies the capacity of the physical fiber cable. It is applied to increase bandwidth over existing fiber networks and transmit data for longer distances.

DWDM transceiver is a kind of fiber optic transceiver with its own features and functions. It is designed for single-mode fiber transmission and operates at a nominal DWDM wavelength from 1528.38 to 1563.86 nm (Channel 17 to Channel 61) as specified by the ITU-T. Like other transceivers, it converts the electrical signal to optical signal and vice versa. The transceiver can support up to 10 Gbps and span a distance up to 120 km, which makes itself stand out in high-capacity and long-distance transmissions.

Types of DWDM Transceivers for DWDM Networks

DWDM transceivers are available in different types, which can support transmission rate from 155 Mbit/s to 10 Gbit/s. Here are the common types of DWDM transceivers classified based on data rate, form factor and fixed or tunable wavelength.

From the Perspective of Data Rate

In the case of data rate, DWDM transceiver usually can be divided into two types: 1G   DWDM transceiver and 10G DWDM transceiver. 1G DWDM transceiver includes DWDM SFP transceiver. 10G DWDM transceiver can be further divided into DWDM SFP+ transceiver, DWDM X2 transceiver, DWDM XFP transceiver and DWDM XENPAK transceiver. DWDM SFP transceiver provides a signal rate range from 100 Mbps to 2.5 Gbps, usually used as part of a DWDM optical network to provide high-capacity bandwidth. DWDM SFP+/X2/XFP/XENPAK transceivers support 10-Gigabit data rates from 9.9G to 11.25G (LAN, WAN, and OTU2/OTU2e) which are applied in different applications.

From the Perspective of Form Factor

In terms of form factor, DWDM transceiver can be classified into DWDM SFP transceiver, DWDM SFP+ transceiver, DWDM X2 transceiver, DWDM XFP transceiver and DWDM XENPAK transceiver. Among those transceivers, DWDM SFP and SFP+ transceivers are the most commonly used ones, based on the SFP form factor which is an MSA standard build. DWDM X2 transceiver is based on the X2 form factor, designed for high speed data transmission for data center networking. It’s an ideal choice for data communications and telecommunications switches and routers. DWDM XFP transceiver is based on the XFP form factor which is also an MSA standard build. DWDM XENPAK transceiver is SC duplex receptacle module and is designed for backbone Ethernet transmission systems, which is the first 10GbE transceiver that supports DWDM. It can support 32 different channels for transmission distance up to 200 km with the aid of EDFAs.

From the Perspective of Fixed or Tunable Wavelength

Considering fixed or tunable wavelength, DWDM transceiver can be divided into fixed wavelength DWDM transceiver and DWDM tunable transceiver. Fixed wavelength DWDM transceiver, as the name implies, the wavelength is fixed. It can only transmit a certain number of wavelength, regular fixed wavelength transceiver transmits wavelength at 1310nm and 1550nm for 10G data transmission applications. The Tunable DWDM transceiver is a unique product which enables you to set the channel or “color” that the laser emits. Typically these tunable optics are for the C-Band 50GHz. Around 88 different channels can be set with intervals of 0.4nm. Tunable transceivers are typically used as “spare-optics”, in case of emergency.

Conclusion

In DWDM systems, a large number of DWDM transceivers with different wavelengths, data rates and form factors are required to satisfy network flexibility in optical network. Now that you know all the types of DWDM transceivers, you can compare them with each other and find the one you need. FS.COM provides a variety of transceivers including those mentioned above. High-quality and cost-effective products, intimate service only at FS.COM. You won’t want to miss it.

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Ethernet Cable Management Solutions

Ethernet cable management, also called network cable management, has been a necessary part for any structured cabling system. However, do you know why Ethernet cable management is needed and how many wire management ways can be exerted, and what their differences are? To know the answers, you can follow this post.

Why Need Ethernet Cable Management?

With a large number of input and output patch cords in racks or cabinets, the patch cord management can effectively provide a stable cabling system for applications of the data center. It can help to prevent unnecessary cable damages and dust, improve cooling and airflow, reduce signal interference and downtime, save space and cost, etc. In most cases, the solution to Ethernet cable managing relies on organizing devices, like patch panels and cable organizers.

Ethernet Cable Management Solutions

Figure 1: Ethernet Cable Management Solutions

Ethernet Cable Management Ways

Customarily, based on how you use network cable organizing devices, the way to manage network cables can be divided into two types: horizontal cable management and vertical cable management. Surely, depending on specified network conditions and special needs, you are allowed to choose the matching type. Sometimes, it’s still possible for you to apply these two types together in cabling.

Horizontal Cable Management

In Ethernet cabling, horizontal cable management is often applied as the 1U cable management. 1U, the acronym of one unit, stands for the height of the racks or cabinets, usually 1.75 inches. The size has been officially set as the standard vertically usable space for 1U. As its name shows, this type of management requires you to place proper managing devices on front racks or cabinets and manage Ethernet cables in a horizontal way. For the 1U horizontal cable managers, the plastic single sided horizontal cable manager with finger duct and the metal horizontal cable manager with five D-rings are the most popular types. While considering Ethernet patch panels, Cat5e patch panels, Cat6 patch panels, and blank keystone patch panels are the commonly used types.

Horizontal Cable Management Devices

Figure 2:Horizontal Cable Management Devices

Vertical Cable Management

Comparing with the horizontal type, the vertical cable management requires you to place organizing devices, usually the cable organizers, at both sides of the racks and secure them in a vertical way. For vertical cable managers, single D-ring vertical cable manager and 5U plastic vertical manger with bend radius finger are the top two types in the market.

Vertical Cable Management Managers

Figure 3:Vertical Cable Management Managers

Summary

In networking cabling, no matter in your homes or office buildings, the Ethernet cable management has been an irreplaceable solution to deal with messy network cables. Choosing what kind of managing method, horizontal cable management, vertical cable management, or the combination of the two types totally depends on your needs.

Networking Patch Panel Wiki, Types, and Purposes

Networking patch panel has been an indispensable part in daily cabling. Whenever setting up connections for all sorts of devices, like servers and switches, you have to deal with a large number of input and output cables. Under such a circumstance, the patch panel for networking will do help to effectively manage those cumbersome cables. Then, a series of questions about patch panel in networking ensued. In this post, what a networking patch panel is and why it is needed will be answered.

Network Cabling

Figure 1: Network Cabling

What is the Networking Patch Panel

Networking patch panel, a kind of cable organizer, is designed to connect and manage copper or fiber optic cables coming in or out. Usually, in networking patch panel cabling, the panel will be attached to racks or enclosures in wiring closets or on walls. Then, patch cords will be used to connect ports in patch panels to ports in servers or network switches.

Types of Networking Patch Panel

Basically, according to the cables connected, there are two types of networking patch panel: Ethernet patch panel and fiber optic patch panel.

Ethernet Patch Panel

Ethernet patch panel, also called copper patch panel, provides interconnections for Ethernet applications in local area network. There are many types of Ethernet patch panels, among which Cat5e patch cable, Cat6 patch cable, and Cat6a patch cables are commonly used in network cabling. As for ports of the copper patch panel, various options also can be found, such as 24 ports and 48 ports. If you want to buy an Ethernet panel, you still have to consider its designs: shielded or unshielded, flat or angled, punch down or feed-through, and loaded or unloaded. With various options, you can always find a needed type.

24 Ports Blank Keystone Ethernet Patch Panel (Left) and 24 Ports Cat6 Shielded Feed-Through Patch Panel (Right)

Figure 2: 24 Ports Blank Keystone Ethernet Patch Panel (Left) and 24 Ports Cat6 Shielded Feed-Through Patch Panel (Right)

Fiber Optic Patch Panel

Fiber optic patch panel, the other branch of networking patch panel, is designed to organize fiber cables. Similar with Ethernet patch panels, the fiber optic patch panels also are varied in designs, such as adapter types, fiber types and fiber count. Conventionally, fiber optic patch panel is commonly used as rack mount fiber patch panel or wall mount patch panel, which also applied for the Ethernet patch panel.

Blank Fiber Patch Panel (Left) and FHU 1U 48F SC Patch Panel (Right)

Figure 3: Blank Fiber Patch Panel (Left) and FHU 1U 48F SC Patch Panel (Right)

Benefits of Patch Panel in Networking

Knowing what the networking patch panel is just partly solves the concern, what is the purpose of patch panel in networking? Understanding the benefits of network patch panel, the question can be solved. Commonly, there are four major benefits shared by networking patch panels:

First, saving time. With a patch panel in networking, changes and repairs of cables are much easier for IT technicians. They don’t need extract time to clear and identify cables.

Second, space saving. Without messy cabling, you can organize cables in a neat and orderly way. Especially, for high-density cabling, a networking patch panel can help you save a lot of space.

Third, reducing the signal interference. When cables separated in an organized way, it will greatly lower the chance for crosstalk and interference between them. As a result, the networking performance will also be enhanced greatly.

Fourth, cost reducing. With previous benefits, it will definitely bring about cost reduction. You don’t need to spend extra money on repairing, managing and future network expansion.

Summary

After revealing what the patch panel is and why it is used, it’s easy to find the networking patch panel is the best solution to manage cables, no matter in the office or home network. As we mentioned, there are various benefits of networking patch panels. However, if you want to make a full advantage of those benefits, a wise use of patch panels is needed. For detailed information about how to wisely use patch panel manage cables, you can refer to the article: Best Patch Panel Cable Management Techniques.

How to Use Cat6a Patch Panel for Network Cabling?

Cat6a patch panel, a kind of copper patch panel has been an important contributor in 10 Gigabit Ethernet for network connection. Nowadays, it has been in a widespread deployment in Ethernet network cabling. With such a great importance, it’s necessary for us to know how to terminate Cat6a patch panel.

Cat6a Patch Panel Cabling

Figure 1: Cat6a Patch Panel Cabling

An Overview of Cat6a Patch Panel

Cat6a patch panel, an improved version of the Cat6 patch panel, is also a mounted hardware assembly containing ports to connect and manage the incoming and outgoing copper cables. Supporting different kinds of Cat6a cables and any earlier generation of Cat cable, it confirms with cabling specifications, like 802.3an (10GBase-T) and TIA Augmented Category 6. By the way, if you want to know more details about Cat6 vs Cat6a patch panel, you can refer to the article, Cat6 Patch Panel vs Cat6a: Difference and Usage.

With different components, there will be corresponding subbranches of the patch panel Cat6a version. If you put ports as a selection basis, there are Cat6a patch panel 12 ports, Cat6a patch panel 24 ports, and Cat6a patch panel 48 ports.

When it comes to the design for high EMI (Electro Magnetic Interference) environments, Cat6a shielded patch panel and unshielded patch panel Cat6a version are found in the market. Moreover, options for connecting methods are also available. You can choose a punch down Cat6a patch panel or a feed-through patch panel Cat6a version.

How to Install Cat6a Patch Panel

Having an overview of the patch panel Cat6a version will be the preparation step to use Cat6a patch panel. As has mentioned in the last part, many types of this cable organizer are available in the market. Different designs come in different wiring methods. The most obvious installing difference lies between punch down Cat6a patch panel or a feed-through patch panel Cat6a version.

Punch Down Cat6a Patch Panel

For the punch down type, on its front plate, it comes in RJ45 ports to directly connect Ethernet cables. While on its rear side, the plate module is set with color markings for punching down Ethernet cables. If you are holding a patch down patch panel Cat6a version, you can follow the steps listed as below one by one:

24 Ports Unshielded Punch Down Patch Panel

Figure 2: 24 Ports Unshielded Punch Down Patch Panel

First, strip about 3-6 inches of the outer jacket from the end of each cable with a cable stripper.

Second, separate cable wires. After removing the outer jacket, four twisted pairs of exposed wires will be found. You need to split each pair into two single wires.

Third, set all the cable wires into its own slots of the patch panel. Please note that don’t make wires exposed too much or twisted in case of the signal weakening.

Fourth, terminate each wire. Use a 110 punch down tool to press down on each wire and cut the excess wire.

Using Punch Down Tool to Terminate Wires

Figure 3:Using Punch Down Tool to Terminate Wires

Fifth, if there is a need, you can write specific information on labels for identification. For example, you can mark the terminated incoming cables with a label to indicate where the cable is from.

Sixth, inspect the wire. After terminating, you need to use a cable tester to check whether all the wires are terminated correctly.

Feed-through Cat6a Patch Panel

As for the feed-through Cat6a patch panel, its installation will be much easier than that of a punch down type. Since the front and the rear plates of the feed-through patch panel Cat6a version are both configured with RJ45 ports, you can directly insert all the cables into the slots of the panel. For a feed-through Cat6a patch panel, you can take the following steps:

First, hold the drawer of patch panel at the height of the layer of the rack you need to set and push it forwardly.

Second, use the appropriate machine screws to attach the patch panel assembly to the rack.

Third, insert cables into the matching port one by one. After that, you can use a strap to secure the cables.

Fourth, it’s an optional step. Similar with punch-through type, you also can write specific information on labels for identification.

Fifth, you still need to make a visual inspection to ensure the safety of all the network environment.

Conclusion

In this article, you will have a full learning of the Cat6a patch panel from its background information to user guide. As for terminating a patch panel Cat6a version, it is not so troublesome as you have imagined.

Wall Mount Patch Panel Basics and User Guide

Patch panel, an indispensable cable managing device, has been divided into wall mount patch panel and rack mount patch panel for different applications. In the previous article, we have explored the rack mount patch panel. Therefore, in this time we will continue to explore the other branch of patch panel: wall mount patch panel.

What Is Wall Mount Patch Panel?

Similar with rack mount patch panel, the wall mount patch panel is also a mounted hardware assembly containing ports to connect and manage the incoming and outgoing fiber or copper cables. The different point is that as its name shows, the wall mount patch panel is a patch panel fixed on the wall instead of in a rack. The patch panel in wall version is regarded as a perfect solution for networking and fiber distribution from the vault or wiring closet to the user’s terminal equipment.

Types of Wall Mount Patch Panel

Conventionally, based on different application environment, the wall mount patch panel is divided into wall mount fiber patch panel and wall mount Ethernet patch panel.

Wall Mount Fiber Patch Panel

For a fiber patch panel in wall mount version, it consists of two parts: the fiber adapter panel and a fiber optic wall mount enclosure. The fiber wall mount enclosure usually collocates with two or four adapter panels. Featured with its flexible and compact design, the patch panel of this type offers a perfect choice for securing and protecting fiber connections in telecommunications closets or other installation areas where wall space is limited.

Wall Mount Fiber Patch Panel

Figure 1: Wall Mount Fiber Patch Panel

Wall Mount Ethernet Patch Panel

When it comes to the wall mount Ethernet patch panel, it also involves in two units: an Ethernet path panel and a wall mount panel bracket. Sharing the same blood with the copper patch panel, the panel of this type is also used in a local area network(LAN) and supports both shielded and unshielded copper cables. In most applications, Cat5e wall mount patch panel and wall mount patch panel Cat6 version are the most favored types.

Cat5e Wall Mount Patch Panel

Figure 2: Cat5e Wall Mount Patch Panel

User Guide for Wall Mount Patch Panel

After knowing some basic information about the wall mount patch panel, here comes another practical question-what should we notice when we buy or use it? Here are two major points:

Size

Here, the size does not only refer to the height, depth, width, and weight of the patch panel, but also the space for the installation of a wall mount patch panel, especially the wall mount fiber patch panel. You need to consider the space for opening and removing the doors of the enclosure.

Loaded or Unloaded

The loaded panel means it’s pre-installed with fiber adapter panels or keystone jacks. Take Cat5e patch panel as an example, it refers to the Ethernet patch panel inside the bracket has been pre-loaded with Cat5e jacks. While the unloaded type is an empty fiber panel or a wall mount keystone patch panel. With unloaded patch panels, users have to install required adapters or keystone jacks before installing the patch panel in the wall.

Conclusion

As a branch of cable management, the wall mount patch panel provides a good solution to optimize your work space by keeping equipment off floors and desks. In order to maximize the benefits of this device, please remember to have a full consideration of all aspects before you use it.

How to Install a Rack Mount Patch Panel?

When looking at the title, especially the words “Rack Mount Patch Panel”, will you hesitate for a moment? Yes, I do. I am thinking what the blood tie does it have with a patch panel and whether it needs to be installed differently. Taking this chance, we will have an exploration for these doubts.

What is a Rack Mount Patch Panel?

It’s easy for us to understand what is a rack mount patch panel. Firstly, you need to bear in mind it’s definitely a patch panel. Sharing the same blood with a patch panel, patch panel rack version is also a mounted hardware assembly containing ports to connect and manage the incoming and outgoing fiber or copper cables. Then, you need to differentiate the rack mount patch panel with wall mount patch panel, the other type of patch panel. When a patch panel associated with the rack mount, it refers specially to a kind of patch panel connecting with racks or rack mount enclosures in a typical data center network.

Rack Mount Patch Panel Cabling

Figure 1:Rack Mount Patch Panel Cabling

Types of Rack Mount Patch Panel

Basically, the rack mount patch panel consists of fiber optic patch panel and copper patch panel used for different applications.

For a rack mount fiber optic patch panel, it is mostly designed for the standard 19-inch rack. Depending on the number of connections required, it is often available in 1U, 2U, 4U configurations with flat or angled design. Typically, the rack mount fiber patch panel has four empty slots where LC/SC fiber adapter panels or cassettes can be installed prior to or during deployment. All in all, according to the space and requirements of your project, there will always be an optical fiber panel suiting for you.

The other type is the copper patch panel. The copper patch panel can be inserted with both shielded or unshielded copper cables like cat5e, cat6, cat6a, and cat7. Among all these types, the cat6 patch panel is the most favored one used for the Gigabit Ethernet high-density cabling. In addition, all these types of rack mount copper panels are available in 24 ports and 48 ports in the market.

24 Ports 1U Rack Mount Fiber Optic Patch Panel (Left) and 24 Ports 1U Shielded Cat6 Rack Mount Patch Panel (Right)

Figure 2: 24 Ports 1U Rack Mount Fiber Optic Patch Panel (Left) and 24 Ports 1U Shielded Cat6 Rack Mount Patch Panel (Right)

Steps of Installing Patch Panel in Rack

Clearing about the rack mount patch panel is just a warming-up step for a better installation. Generally, there are three main steps for users to install a blank rack mount patch panel. If a pre-loaded rack mount is held, you can directly start from the second installation step.

Preparation

Before installation, the user should evaluate how many rack units are going to be used. Then you can decide the number and the size of the patch panel. After that, you need to choose the jacks that you are going to use. Then you can install the jacks into the patch panels.

Installation

First, you can hold the drawer of patch panel at the height of the layer of the rack you need to set and push it forwardly. Then you need to use the appropriate machine screws to attach the patch panel assembly to the rack.

Installing Rack Mount Patch Panel

Figure 3: Installing Rack Mount Patch Panel

Second, insert cables into the matching port one by one. After that, you can use a strap to secure the cables. Typically, for fiber optical cables, we would prefer to use a Velcro cable tie to strap; while copper cables, we would use Nylon cable tie.

Third, if there is a need, you can write specific information on labels for identification.

Validation

Finishing the second step, you still need to make a visual inspection to ensure the safety of all the network environment. After following all these three steps, the installation can be finished.

Conclusion

Rack mount patch panel is the most popular solution to manage cables in dater center network. Especially, there are plenty of types of rack mount patch panel for choosing, which have been proved to be a kind of future-proof management. It’s practical and wise for us to learn how to use it.